Grafton Man Accused Of Shaking Baby, Causing A Number Of Injuries

A Grafton man is facing charges alleging he shook a 3-month-old baby who later was flown to Fargo for emergency medical attention.

The infant was taken to a medical facility May 11 and airlifted to Sanford Medical Center because of the severity of the injuries, an affidavit for Bruce Lee Umphrey’s arrest said.

The baby’s brain was bleeding, according to the affidavit, which also noted she suffered a stroke, fractured rib, had hemorrhages in both eyes, bruising around her chin and lower cheek, spinal cord compression and a bulging soft spot on her head. Police said the injuries were consistent with shaken baby syndrome.

Umphrey admitted to Grafton police he shook the baby two separate times at his home, 827 Prospect Ave., because he was frustrated she was vomiting, crying or seemed inconsolable, the affidavit said. Umphrey noticed immediate changes in the baby’s demeanor and said her condition worsened as time passed, which is why she was taken to the doctor, the affidavit said. Umphrey told police he knew his actions were wrong and he hid them from everyone, according to the court document.

He is facing charges of aggravated assault and child abuse. Each felony charge holds a maximum penalty of 10 years behind bars.

This article was originally published by Grandforksherald.com.

Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.

 

Adopted Child With Shaken Baby Syndrome Beats The Odds, Becomes A Police Officer

Jaron was just 3 years old when we first met him.

A foster child since birth, he was diagnosed with shaken baby syndrome and any prospective adoptive families would be told he could have developmental delays.

But one family watching Wednesday’s Child on NBC4 years ago saw something special in Jaron.

“The day I saw him it was on television — your show — and for some reason it was like a magnet, like ‘we want that child,” recounted Earl Taylor.

“We had just started the process when we got an assignment here in the Washington, D.C. area,” Sarah said.

They had found a home, but the timing was off. The Taylors needed to get settled, but Sarah called to ask about Jaron anyway.

“We knew that [he] was the the one we wanted to try to adopt,” Earl said.

“I said, if I can’t have that one, then I don’t want any,” Sarah said.

The call led to several visits with Jaron, and Earl said they knew from the first visit that there was no turning back.

“The first day that I saw him, he came up to me and he asked. He said, ‘Are you my daddy?'” Earl said. “And I said, yes, I am.”

It didn’t take long for Jaron to bond with Sarah as well. She was convinced on his first overnight visit.

“One evening, we were in my bedroom watching television and he looked up at me at said, ‘you know, I love you,” Sarah recounted. “I just didn’t know what to do after that.”

Although social workers had warned about the long-term affects of Jaron’s mistreatment as an infant, the Taylors decided to use their own brand of healing for their son.

“The ladies were advocating that he needed to have Ritalin and he was ADHD and all that,” Earl said. “I told them, no, all he needs is love and all he needs is attention and direction.”

The Taylors brough Jaron home to his new brick house and the years just seemed to fly by.

He still remembers things about coming home the first time at just 3 years old.

“I guess the main one would be in the driveway asking my dad, ‘Are you my dad?'”

Jaron says he also remembers his dad responding with a yes.

Those were tender moments with two career military parents who could be tough, too, Jaron told NBC4’s Barbara Harrison.

“Tough but not pushy. They got the job done. Here I am now,” he said with a laugh.

His parents are very proud of the man Jaron has become after overcoming challenges, including the shaken baby syndrome that led some to say he would never run or ride a bike.

“A lot of the things they told us that he couldn’t do or he wouldn’t be able to do, he’s done,” Sarah said. “When you’re a police officer, you have to run.”

Jaron remains close with his parents, teaching martial arts classes with mom Sarah in Fort Washington and cheering on the Redskins with dad Earl.

This article was originally published by NBCPhiladelphia.com.

Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.

Doctor Accused In Shaken Baby Death Case

The Massachusetts doctor accused of murder in the 2014 death of a 6-month-old baby took the stand Wednesday in her own defense.

During her trial at Middlesex Superior Court, Dr. Pallavi Macharla, 44, was somber as she relived the details of March 27, 2014, when Ridhima Dhekane died while in her care at her Burlington apartment.

“I held her like this,” Macharla showed the court. “And with one hand, I opened the tap, I took the paper towel and wet it with water and I started cleaning her.”

Macharla, who has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder, testified that she had fed Dhekane homemade applesauce and put her down for a nap. While she did the dishes in the other room and put her own son down for a nap, she said Dhekane was alone in her swing.

Woman Goes on Trial in Alleged Shaking Death

That’s when Macharla said she discovered the baby a short time later, covered in vomit, and quickly cleaned her up.

“At that point I heard a noise — gurgling noise from her mouth and I turned her towards me, and when I saw her face her eyes were closed and I called out her name,” said Macharla.

She also testified that she called Dhekane’s mother and did mouth-to-mouth breathing, but did not call 911.

“At that time, all I knew was that she was not breathing – she had labored breathing, so at that time all I was thinking was to bring her back to breathing,” said Macharla.

Despite efforts to save her, Dhekane was pronounced dead three days later at Boston Children’s Hospital. The defense said the injuries to Dhekane that may have looked like shaken baby syndrome were actually caused by both the efforts to save her, including nearly an hour of CPR and the machines she was put on for four days after she was likely brain dead.

Prosecutors allege Dhekane was a perfectly healthy baby leading up to that March day and the only explanation is that her babysitter inflicted the fatal injuries.

Under cross examination, prosecutors got Macharla to admit her story about what happened that day has changed.

“You kept lying,” said Middlesex County Assistant District Attorney Katharine Folger.

“I said few lies,” responded Macharla.

She admitted that she had alerted a friend down the hall she was leaving and left Dhekane alone.

“You said that your neighbor brought your son home from school,” pressed Folger, to which Macharla said yes.

The defense is expected to wrap up Thursday. The jury could get the case and begin deliberating by Friday.

This article was originally published by NBCBoston.com.

Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.