Police: Man Shook And Slammed Baby Whose Brain Injuries Required Coma

Police say a 32-year-old Wisconsin Rapids man shook and hit his 3-month-old daughter, causing brain damage that required doctors to put her in a medically induced coma for a month.

Joseph P. Lemay, 32, Wisconsin Rapids, is in jail on a $100,000 cash bond set Friday by Wood County Circuit Judge Greg Potter for two counts of child abuse and two felony counts of child neglect.

Police charged the baby’s mother, Meghan E. Newman, 33, of Marshfield, with a felony charge of neglecting a child; the baby’s injuries occurred while Newman was away for the weekend.

According to court documents: 

Doctors at the Marshfield Medical Center on Feb. 18 reported to the Marshfield Police Department concerns about injuries suffered by a 3-month-old baby girl. The girl was bruised across her body, had “significant” brain bleeding and was having seizures, according to a doctor. 

The doctor told police the baby had serious injuries consistent with child abuse and shaken baby syndrome. The doctor said because the baby suffered significant brain trauma and brain hemorrhaging, doctors had to sedate her into a medically-induced coma where she would remain almost a month. 

Lemay told detectives he became frustrated with the baby when he was watching her for a weekend, and she wouldn’t stop crying and “slammed her onto the couch” a couple of times, which may have made her head shake. When detectives said that wouldn’t have caused the baby’s injuries, Lemay said he had become frustrated with the baby on the morning of Feb. 17 because she wouldn’t stop crying. He said he shook her in her bouncy seat for about 30 seconds, making her head snap back and forth. 

Lemay said when he finished shaking his daughter, she looked at him with a shocked expression and immediately began to cry. 

Lemay said he shook his daughter even more aggressively the next day when he again became frustrated with her crying. He said he shook her for one to two minutes with her head snapping back and forth. 

Newman told detectives that she left her children, including their 3-month-old baby, home with Lemay. Newman left town with friends at 11:30 a.m. Friday, Feb. 16. 

Newman said Lemay called her six times on the morning of Feb. 17. He told her the baby was throwing up and Newman told him to give the baby some medicine she had in the house. Newman told a detective that nothing Lemay said made her think something was seriously wrong with the baby. 

Lemay again called Newman on Sunday morning and said the baby threw up again. Newman wasn’t concerned and returned home as planned on Sunday evening. Newman told detectives the baby was warm to the touch when she arrived home and she decided to give her a bath. Newman noticed bruises on the baby but continued the bath rather than ask Lemay about them. 

When the baby began having seizures, Newman took her to Marshfield Medical Center. 

Newman told a detective she knew Lemay could get violent at times. She said she would have a neighbor look in on him as a safety precaution when he was watching the children. She did not have anyone check on Lemay during her weekend away. 

Lemay had been convicted of first-degree reckless injury in 2007 after he and another man beat a Marshfield man with a pipe. Lemay was sentenced to eight years in prison and eight years extended supervision, according to court records. 

Lemay said he and Newman both knew he was not supposed to spend the night at her residence and he was not supposed to have contact with children as part of the terms of his extended supervision. Police said Lemay told them Newman knew he had a history of violence with children. Doctors do not yet know how extensive the damage is to the baby’s brain.

Lemay’s next court appearance is scheduled for Friday. If convicted, he faces a maximum sentence of 105 years in prison. Newman faces a maximum sentence of 14 years in prison, if she is convicted. 

Newman is scheduled to make an initial appearance May 14 on a felony charge of neglecting a child and misdemeanor charges of encouraging a parole violation and obstructing an officer. 

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Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.

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Greenacres-Area Woman Arrested For Shaking Baby

A baby’s hysterical cries screamed through the home as a Friday night in March turned into a Saturday morning.

The little girl’s caregiver, Kyanna Trenier Johnson, was exhausted. She picked up the 9-month-old and shook her

The Greenacres-area woman told a Palm Beach County sheriff’s detective she wasn’t sure how long, or how forcefully, she shook the baby.

All she knew was that the baby stopped the crying. 

Within 48 hours, the baby underwent brain surgery at St. Mary’s Medical Center in West Palm Beach, sheriff’s records state. She has multiple skull fractures, brain hemorrhaging and ruptures in her eye tissues. The injuries could be life-threatening, a doctor told sheriff’s authorities. By Tuesday, though, the baby’s condition had improved, a family member told The Post. 

Johnson, 28, was arrested early Saturday on an aggravated child abuse charge. She was released that afternoon on a $15,000 surety bond and ordered not to have contact with the baby, who is now 10 months old.

Johnson declined to comment for this story. However, a family member said he didn’t believe Johnson ever would hurt the child. 

Johnson does not appear to have a criminal history in Palm Beach County. 

The Florida Department of Children and Families said it plans “to hold the individual responsible to fullest extent of the law.”

“I am absolutely appalled that anyone would abuse an innocent child this way,” Secretary Mike Carroll said in a statement released late Tuesday.

A detective and a DCF investigator met with Johnson on March 26 in a waiting room outside St. Mary’s Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. 

Johnson, whose relationship with the infant is redacted from sheriff’s records, said the little girl hit her head in the bathtub about a week ago. Days after, the infant barely ate, slept unusual hours and cried incessantly. 

Johnson figured she had either a cold or growing pains. 

A few days later, the baby’s cries became hysterical screams, Johnson said. Late March 23, or early March 24, Johnson picked the shrieking baby up from the crib and shook her. 

The crying stopped.

Early on March 25, Johnson checked on the baby and noticed her diaper was wet. She positioned the baby to change her and noticed the little girl “was moaning (a) really soft, pitiful cry like a kitten or something,” she told authorities. 

The baby barely could keep her right eye open. She was limp and nearly unresponsive. She called 911. 

Preventing shaken baby syndrome

Doctors and researchers say education and counseling on normal infant-crying patterns and greater care for overwhelmed parents and caretakers can keep Shaken Baby Syndrome from happening. For more information, go online to www.dontshake.org/learn-more or call the

Johnson initially denied ever shaking the baby. Her live-in boyfriend, whom The Post is not naming because he does not face charges, said he hadn’t seen Johnson hurt the child. He never shook the baby, either, he said.

But when detectives spoke with Johnson again Friday — after a doctor determined the only way the baby could have sustained such seriously injured was by “severe shaking” — Johnson tearfully told a detective she never meant to hurt the baby. The detective noted in the arrest report how remorseful Johnson seemed. 

Records indicate she lives just outside the Greenacres city limits near Lake Worth and Haverhill roads with her boyfriend and two other children, 8 and 3.

However, it’s unclear whether that is where she was when she shook the baby. 

The child’s siblings are in the care of a relative, DCF said late Tuesday.

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Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.

Jacksonville Mother Speaks Out About Shaken Baby Syndrome

A Jacksonville mother is warning other parents about the shaken baby syndrome, the leading cause of child abuse deaths in the U.S.

Bonita Tate’s daughter Deshauna was shaken by a family member in 1995, when she was a 52-day-old baby.

“When I got home, I found her in her swing, lifeless. She had had no oxygen to her brain for over an hour.”

Now, 22 years later, her adult daughter is nonverbal, uses a wheelchair and still wears diapers.

According to the National Center on Shaken Baby Syndrome, the No. 1 trigger for shaken baby syndrome is frustration over a baby’s crying, and 25 percent of shaken babies die.

For children such as Deshauna, the complications can last a lifetime.

For resources and where to get information about shaken baby syndrome, visit dontshake.org.

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Shaken baby syndrome is a form of child abuse. When a baby is shaken hard by the shoulders, arms, or legs, it can cause learning disabilities, behavior disorders, vision problems or blindness, hearing and speech issues, seizures, cerebral palsy, serious brain injury, and permanent disability. In some cases, it can even be fatal.

Causes

Ever notice how long it takes babies to hold their heads up? Their neck muscles start out weak and get stronger as they grow. The same goes for their brains, which still need time to develop.

When a baby is shaken, its brain can bounce between the front and back of its skull. This causes it to bleed, bruise, and swell. It only takes a few seconds of aggressive shaking for this to happen.

What It’s Not

Shaken baby syndrome is different from gently tossing a baby playfully into the air or bouncing a baby on your knee. Though their brains and necks are fragile, babies are also unlikely to get shaken injuries by falling off furniture or making sudden stops in a car.

Symptoms

Being shaken affects babies in many different ways. Symptoms include vomiting, bluish skin, tremors or shakes, breathing issues, and drowsiness. Babies may also become less interested in eating; have trouble sucking, and stop smiling and talking.

Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.

Baby Boxes Help Parents

Having a baby can be overwhelming.

90 by 30 is trying to make it a little easier.

The county-wide program is dedicated to preventing child abuse by 90 percent by 2030 and in the fall of last year, it rolled out the first tangible program aimed at achieving that goal.

The Baby Box program provides families residing in Lane County newborn essentials and, hopefully, a connection to the community.

“It’s based on Finland’s concept,” said 90 by 30’s Rachel Norquist. “It’s surrounding the goal of a safe sleep system and preventing SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) but the box is a vehicle to create a connection with the community so new parents have a support system.”

While new parents in Finland get an empty box for babies to sleep in, parents who receive a box from 90 by 30, get a bit more.

In every box, there are newborn essentials: a sleep sack, onesies, diapers, wipes and sanitizer. But that’s not all. Families are also gifted donated items handmade by organizations like Tummy Time Quilt and Click for Babies Cap. Both organizations create the products specifically for the baby boxes and try to include encouragement even when it’s not immediately obvious.

“The caps for the babies have a lot of purple in them to represent the ‘period of purple crying.’ Just as a reminder to new parents,” Norquist said.

The Period of PURPLE Crying is part of the National Center on Shaken Baby Syndrome, a non-profit organization. The goal is to provide information to first-time parents on the misconceptions of “fussy” babies. According to the program, the period of PURPLE crying begins at approximately two weeks and runs until about four months old and is described as a developmental stage. The letters P-U-R-P-L-E- stand for Peak of Crying, Unexpected, Resists Soothing, Pain-like Face, Long Lasting and Evening, a way to remind parents that the crying will pass.

“It’s reassuring parents that sometimes babies cry and you’re not doing anything wrong,” Norquist said.

The program’s goal is to reduce frustration through education and decrease the cases of shaken baby syndrome. So, volunteers incorporate the color purple into their blankets and caps for the baby box.

“You should see their faces when they get this box,” Norquist said. “Some of our low-income families say they finally have a space for their baby.”

Since its conception last October, the program has handed out 26 baby boxes with only a staff of volunteers and one paid employee. “I come from corporate America and when we launched this box I said, ‘Guys, we just launched a product,’” Norquist said. “We launched a product with volunteers when it would have taken 30 people and a budget of a million dollars.”

Baby box applications are simple. South Lane County residents must fill out an invitation—which is less than a page long—or contact Norquist. There are no other requirements for receiving a baby box.

“It’s a self-referral program. We get people who their friends refer them but mostly it’s a self- referral and all they need is to reside in South Lane County,” Norquist said.

Currently, the program has 65 registrants and on Thursday, March 15, Norquist was off to deliver another box to a family and its newborn.

To register for a baby box or for more information, visit 90by30.com or contact (541) 870-0689.

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Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.

Woman Charged For Shaking Her Baby

HOFFMAN ESTATES, Ill. – A babysitter is facing charges after officials said she abused a 5-month-old baby.

Delfina Bautista, 30, was charged with aggravated battery to a child on Sunday.

Officials said the baby was hospitalized because she was lethargic after being in the care of Bautista, who is the child’s babysitter.

Doctors noticed injuries consistent with shaken baby syndrome. They contacted police and the Department of Child and Family Services.

Bautista is due in court Wednesday.

The baby is currently in critical condition.

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When a baby is shaken, its brain can bounce between the front and back of its skull. This causes it to bleed, bruise, and swell. It only takes a few seconds of aggressive shaking for this to happen.

Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.

Father Only Gets Two Years In Shaken Baby Case

Father Only Gets Two Years In Shaken Baby Case

A Scott County child will not be allowed to see his parents again following a court order made Tuesday in Circuit Court.

A judge sentenced Luke Stallard to serve two years in prison and cease all contact with his son who was severely abused in 2016, according to information from the Scott County Commonwealth Attorney’s office.

Stallard’s wife Summer was given a four-year sentence last month after the state presented evidence of the child’s horrific injuries likely caused by shaken baby syndrome. The infant suffered a skull fracture, 23 broken ribs, subdural hematoma and lumbar injuries.

Commonwealth’s Attorney Marcus McClung had recommended a 20-year sentence for Summer Stallard and said last month he was “heartbroken” by Judge Jeffery Hamilton’s decision.

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Babies bring a lot of joy, but there can also be moments of frustration if you feel like you can’t console their crying. Most caregivers handle those times just fine. But if those feelings boil over, it can cross a line.

Shaken baby syndrome is a form of child abuse. When a baby is shaken hard by the shoulders, arms, or legs, it can cause learning disabilities, behavior disorders, vision problems or blindness, hearing and speech issues, seizures, cerebral palsy, serious brain injury, and permanent disability. In some cases, it can even be fatal.

Causes

Ever notice how long it takes babies to hold their heads up? Their neck muscles start out weak and get stronger as they grow. The same goes for their brains, which still need time to develop.

When a baby is shaken, its brain can bounce between the front and back of its skull. This causes it to bleed, bruise, and swell. It only takes a few seconds of aggressive shaking for this to happen.

Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.

A Mother Is Still Waiting For Answers After The Death Of Her Baby

A mother who lost her newborn baby to a string of unthinkable and ‘sinister’ injuries is still waiting for answers six years after his death.

Michael Smedley was only five months old when he died following traumatic head under suspicious circumstances in Alice Springs, Northern Territory, in 2012.

An autopsy later revealed he had 26 bruises and cuts on his little body, damage to his anus, blood on his nappy, and had injuries consistent with ‘shaken baby syndrome’, when he died.

His mother Tayla Smedley – who was only 16 when her son died – has been forced to endure years of legal roadblocks including forensic inadequacies and the suspension of the lead detective in the case.

‘They [the DPP] keep saying there’s not enough evidence, but I don’t understand how much more evidence they need than what’s already been presented,’ Ms. Smedley told ABC.

‘I love my girls but it breaks my heart when they bring up Michael because I can’t tell them they will grow up without their older brother.’

The heartbroken mother had been unable to care for her son leading up to his death as she was ‘living in her car’ but said Michael was a happy baby.

‘He always smiled, he always laughed, there wasn’t really a sour bone in his body,’ she said.  

Michael had been in the care of Ms. Smedley’s friend Tamara Cole and her partner Oliver Deighton who has been the only person of interest in the case in six long years.

Mr. Deighton was alone with Michael in the hours before the boy became unconscious, before Ms. Cole returned home to collect the child and take him to daycare.

He said he left Michael alone on a changing table while he went outside as a friend had come to collect a set of car keys.

Mr. Deighton said when he re-entered the room he saw Michael slide towards the edge of the table and topple over head first.

He said he caught the boy before he hit the ground but the baby began jerking and hiccupping.

An hour later when Mr. Deighton went to retrieve Michael after Ms. Cole came home he noticed the baby was not breathing and his body had become limp.

Michael was pronounced dead just after 4pm at Alice Springs Hospital – more than six hours after he slid off the changing table.

Hemorrhaging on Michael’s eyes and swelling on his brain are symptoms of shaken baby syndrome but blood was also found in his nappy and a swab appeared to show sperm, the inquest heard.

The inquest also found a CT brain scan was performed shortly before he was pronounced dead and a pediatrician was of the view Michael had been ‘shaken vigorously’. 

A doctor at the time also described bruising found on the sole of Michael’s foot as ‘sinister’, the inquest heard.

Medical disagreement over the cause of Michael’s death sparked the coronial inquest but it did not result in much-needed closure for Ms. Smedley.

‘I want Michael to have justice, I want people to know that it wasn’t an accident, I want him to be remembered for all the right reasons and not all the wrong,’ Ms. Smedley told the publication.

Mr. Deighton was called to give evidence on the final day of the inquest in December 2016.

But he was withdrawn as a witness when he refused to answer questions, stating his responses might implicate him in Michael’s death, which he was entitled to do. 

Mr. Deighton works as disability caretaker and was questioned by police but never charged. 

It is believed he still lives in Alice Springs. 

This article was originally published by DailyMail.com.

Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.

‘Masquerade’ To Help Fight Shaken Baby Syndrome

A romantic evening with music, hors d’oeuvres and formal dress is planned for Saturday, with proceeds going to two non-profit groups.

The first Masquerade 2018 will be 8-11 p.m. Saturday at Rabbittown Trade Center, 36 College St. The event is a fundraiser for both Reagan’s Rescue Fund and First Gig Rock N’ Roll Camp for Kids.

People are required to dress up in formal or semi-formal clothing, and to wear masks.

“This is a good time for people to get together for Valentine’s Day and to get dressed up,” said Derek Sanders, an organizer along with his brother, Neil Culpepper.

Only 200 tickets will be available, Sanders said, and they’re selling quickly. He expects the event to sell out.

Musical performances will be by Dustin Danger, Andy Moreillon, Love Sign and the Brass Junkies. There will be a cash bar and hors d’oeuvres available, and after-hours will be held at the nearby Shovelhead Saloon.

Sanders stressed this is not a costume party, but masks are suggested and will be available for purchase.

“It will be very beautiful and very elegant,” Greg Williams said. He and his wife, Marsha, are helping with the decorations.

Rabbittown is the perfect venue with its lights, exposed brick, and varnished hardwood floors, he said. Although the dress is formal, Williams said a nice suit, instead of a tuxedo, is OK for the men; his wife plans to wear a long gown.

Referring to the brothers, he said, “They wanted to do something for the organizations in town. In their differing ways, they cater to young people and they felt it was a good fit.”

At the event, information about Reagan’s Rescue and First Gig will be available.

Williams is the grandfather of Reagan Emery Williams, who died July 2, 2006, at age 1 ½ years, the victim of Shaken Baby Syndrome.

“This gives us an opportunity to share information about Reagan’s Rescue. We’re excited about this possibility,” he said. The fund’s goal is to educate people about the syndrome.

The group’s latest project is to distribute posters around town warning: Never shake a baby.

After 11 years, the project sometimes stalls, but then something like the Masquerade comes along, and revitalizes it, he said.

Also at the event, Peter Blackmon, general manager of the David S. Palmer Arena, will have information about First Gig, which is sponsored by the arena and Danville Area Community College.

The young people work with professional musicians, learn about instruments and being in a band, how to put on a rock show and learn about the record industry.

Sanders, a salesman at Carmack Car Capitol, said his brother came up with the idea for “Masquerade.” Culpepper is a hair stylist in Champaign, and has lived in St. Louis and Chicago. The brothers are from Oakwood.

When Culpepper went to Danville’s Festival of Trees, Sanders said, “He was amazed at how well Danville did this. He wanted to do something formal, too.”

When it came time to choose the charities, Sanders said he’s passionate about First Gig. “It’s amazing to watch the kids come together and do something positive,” he said, adding, it keeps them out of trouble.

As for Reagan’s Rescue, Sanders said, “Greg’s passion for the cause 12 years later is what impresses me.” Sometimes, people beat the drum, but then drop the cause after a while — but not Williams.

Sanders said they plan on doing the event again next year, and plan on keeping it intimate at just 200 people. Next year, Reagan’s Rescue and First Gig will be the beneficiaries again.

FYI

“Masquerade” tickets are $30 per person or $50 per couple. Tickets may be purchased at the David S. Palmer Arena box office or from Derek Sanders at Carmack Car Capitol. They also may be ordered online at www.palmerarena.com.

If available, tickets will be sold at the door, but organizers expect the event to sell out in advance.

Learn more about Reagan’s Rescue Fund at www.reagansrescuefund.com

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Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.

Time Does Not Heal All Wounds: Braxson Jones’ Story

Susan Jones is anxious to share the improvements being made by her son Braxson.

Nearly a year and a half after suffering injuries that resulted in a criminal abuse case against his father, the 2-year-old boy is gaining strength, no longer throws up eight to 12 times a day, is taking far less seizure medication, and can now smile and laugh, she said.

“He can roll over,” Jones said.

But Braxson remains blind and on a feeding tube, which he likely will rely on his entire life, she said. The boy is unable to sit up while other children his age are running around and beginning to explore the world around them.

“He’ll never walk,” Jones said. “He’ll never talk. He’ll always be at home with me.”

Braxson, who already has undergone multiple brain and eye surgeries and spent eight days in a coma, faces further surgery to rebuild his skull that had to be opened to accommodate the brain swelling from the original injuries.

“They’re deciding if they’re going to take a rib to put where the skull is,” Jones said.

All that was placed on hold for at least a short time on Monday as Braxson celebrated his second birthday at the nearby Lakes of the Four Seasons Fire Department with those who first came to his aid July 24, 2016.

Criminal case against dad still pending

Jones said she was working an overnight shift as a nurse on that day when she received an early morning call from her estranged husband, Curtis Jones, saying their son was cold, stiff and not opening his eyes.

“What are you doing calling me?” she told Curtis, instructing him to call 911.

During that 911 call, 47-year-old Curtis, a former Porter County police officer, spoke to the 911 operator about mutual acquaintances and downplayed his son’s condition, according to charging information. He also requested that emergency responders not use emergency lights and sirens.

Authorities said the young boy could be heard on the recording of the 911 call displaying agonal breathing, which is characteristic of someone of the verge of dying.

The child was rushed to a local hospital and then to the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, where a doctor said the child suffered “the worst brain injury I have ever seen,” according to court documents.

The doctors determined that the injuries were consistent with being shaken and must have occurred near the time of the 911 call or the boy would have died before reaching the hospital, according to officials.

Curtis Jones, who is charged with felony counts of battery resulting in serious bodily injury to a person less than 14 years of age, aggravated battery and neglect of a dependent, has a status hearing scheduled for Jan. 22 before Porter Superior Court Judge Roger Bradford.

He currently is living and working in Florida while his case is pending, according to Larry Rogers, his defense attorney.

He is there, at least in part, to avoid the backlash he has received on social media from Susan Jones, according to Rogers.

“He wants to avoid any conflict with his ex-wife,” Rogers said.

Susan Jones maintains a Facebook page titled Justice for Brax that features the mugshot of Curtis Jones and updates on Braxson.

Braxson gets national attention

“What a fighter Susan is,” said Marisa McPeek-Stringham, information and research specialist with the National Center on Shaken Baby Syndrome.

“She’s just fighting for him to get justice,” she said. “She’s very inspiring.”

The organization was so moved by Braxson’s case that it decided to feature it as part of this year’s Giving Tuesday campaign, which is part of a national effort kicking off the charitable giving season the Tuesday following Thanksgiving, McPeek-Stringham said.

There are 1,200 to 1,400 cases of shaken baby syndrome/abusive head trauma reported in this country each year, and it is the No. 1 cause of child abuse death for children under age 2, she said.

Jones said she would like to see Indiana join other states in requiring new parents to watch a video of shaken baby syndrome before leaving the hospital with their newborns.

The National Center on Shaken Baby Syndrome has a Period of Purple Crying campaign aimed at educating adults about and reducing the incidence of shaken baby syndrome/abusive head trauma.

Jones said she tried returning to her nursing job after being away for 15 months, but had to quit again recently after just a few months on the job when the daily care for Braxson became too much for non-professional caregivers.

“I’m fighting to get him nursing care,” she said.

Jones also is exploring ways of funding stem cell treatments at $14,000 each, which have the potential to help repair Braxson’s vision, motor skills, swallowing and alertness.

At the same time, she also is mother to another son, 3-year-old son Brantley, who joins in the caregiving as much as he can.

“He’s always kissing him, saying, ‘Love you, baby,'” she said.

Susan Jones said this is not where she thought she would be at this point in her life.

“I thought I’d be a nurse, a mom and living happily ever after,” she said. “Just a normal life.”

Click here to read the original.

Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.

Fighting Shaken Baby Syndrome

Every year, thousands of infants are shaken and abused at the hands of a frustrated parent or caregiver. Frustration with a crying infant is the number one trigger for shaking and abuse of infants. Parents know and expect that their baby will cry, but most have no idea how much or how frustrating that crying can be.

In an effort to educate parents and caregivers about normal infant crying and reduce frustration, the Welcome Newborns program of the Community Action Agency in Delta County is partnering with the National Center on Shaken Baby Syndrome CLICKS for Babies campaign.

The grassroots campaign invites local knitters and crocheters to make purple colored baby caps, which will be delivered to Delta County families between the months of September and May and a copy of the “Period of PURPLE Crying,” an evidence based program that educates parents and caregivers about normal infant crying, ways to cope with the crying and the dangers of reacting in frustration by shaking or abusing an infant.

The handmade purple caps are meant to serve as a reminder for parents about the Period of PURPLE Crying and the dangers of shaking a baby.

Click your needles together and help protect babies. Caps should be made using any shade of soft purple colored yarn and made to fit a new infant’s head. Dimensions of infant heads will vary. As a guide, the average newborn head circumference is 13 to 14 inches. Hats should be approximately four to six inches high. Refrain from including “pom poms” or any type of strap to secure caps to babies’ heads as they pose a potential choking and/or strangling hazard for babies.

Any shade of soft purple yarn can be used, additional colors can be added, but the cap should be at least 75% purple.

Participants are encouraged to knit or crochet as many hats as they would like to donate. Completed caps can be dropped off or mailed to the Welcome Newborns office located at the Community Action Agency at 507 1st Avenue North in Escanaba. Caps will be collected through the end of May. For more information, call Lannie at the Welcome Newborns office at (906) 786-7080 extension 143.

For more information about CLICK for Babies Campaign, including patterns for caps, guidelines and details about the national campaign are available at www.CLICKforbabies.org.

This article was originally written by the Daily Press. Click here to view it.

Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.