New Course For Reducing The Risks Of SIDS And Shaken Baby Syndrome

ChildCare Education Institute® (CCEI), an online child care training provider dedicated exclusively to the early care and education workforce, is proud to introduce HLTH110: Protecting Infants: Reducing the Risk of SIDS and Shaken Baby Syndrome to the online child care training course catalog.

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden death of an infant younger than one year of age that remains unexplained after autopsy.  Understanding sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is extremely important to early care providers because it is the leading cause of death of infants between one month and one year of age.  According to the Centers for Disease Control, there are roughly 3500 SUID cases each year in the United States.  Sleep is the one common factor in nearly all SUID cases.  Most SUID cases occur within an unsafe sleeping environment.  Creating a safe sleep environment is extremely important. Body position during sleep is critical in order to decrease the likelihood of SIDS, but there are many other factors that contribute to a safe sleep environment.  For child care providers and parents, currently recommended SIDS prevention practices offer the best path to avoiding any type of SUID.

One study showed that in the United States, approximately 20 percent of SIDS deaths occur while the infant is under the protection of a child care provider. Using statistical analysis, researchers found that this number should be closer to 8 percent. By following the recommendations in this course, early childhood professionals will be able to create a safe sleep environment, designed to decrease the chances of SIDS in your environment.  Studies show that providers are more likely to use the back sleep position when centers have written sleep policies and proper training has been provided.

Shaken baby syndrome (SBS) is a life altering, deadly, and preventable form of child abuse.  It is the leading cause of death in child abuse cases in the United States.  There are an estimated 1,000 to 1,500 reported cases of shaken baby syndrome in the United States each year. Some experts feel that this estimate is too low as cases of SBS may be misdiagnosed.  Overall, caregivers other than the child’s biological parents are responsible for up to 21 percent of SBS cases.

This course is designed to increase participants’ knowledge about ways they can protect infants from the risks of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and shaken baby syndrome (SBS). Throughout the course participants will be introduced to risk reducing and preventative strategies designed to keep infants safe. Information provided will also prepare participants to share this life-saving information with families.

“Child care professionals who care for newborns and infants play an important role in the effort to reduce SIDS and SBS,” says Maria C. Taylor, President and CEO of CCEI.  “Caregivers are role models for parents and families.”

HLTH110: Protecting Infants: Reducing the Risk of SIDS and Shaken Baby Syndrome is a two-hour, beginner-level course and grants 0.2 IACET CEU upon successful completion. Current CCEI users with active, unlimited annual subscriptions can register for professional development courses at no additional cost when logged in to their CCEI account. Users without subscriptions can purchase child care training courses as block hours through CCEI online enrollment.

For more information, visit www.cceionline.edu or call 1.800.499.9907, prompt 3, Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. EST.

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Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.

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Rotterdam Father Accused Of Shaking Baby

A Rotterdam man accused of seriously injuring his 2-month-old son by shaking him pleaded not guilty Thursday to a four count indictment in the case.

Tristan Tinney, 21, of Phillip Street, faces charges of first-degree assault and reckless assault on a child, both felonies. If convicted of first-degree assault, he faces up to 25 years in prison.

Authorities said Tinney shook the baby in April, causing brain injuries, fractured ribs and a subsequent seizure consistent with shaken baby syndrome. The baby went untreated for 18 hours before the mother saw the baby having a seizure and sought medical attention. The baby was then taken to Albany Medical Center.

The baby has since been released from the hospital and is recovering, prosecutor Christina Tremante-Pelham said. The nearly 4-month-old will have lasting effects, but the full extent of those won’t be known for some time, she said.

Judge Kathleen Hogan kept Tinney’s previously set bail at $50,000 and $100,000 bond.

Hogan raised an issue with the defense regarding Tinney’s stated address as Phillip Street, where the victim resides. A no-contact order was put in place, and should Tinney post bail, he will have to live somewhere else and refrain from contacting the mother or the child in any way.

The police investigation began after Child Protective Services alerted police to the boy’s injuries, after doctors determined they were consistent with shaken baby syndrome, police have said.

Investigators then determined the injuries happened while Tinney was watching the child and that he intentionally caused the injuries, police said previously. There were no witnesses.

This article was originally published by DailyGazette.com.

Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.

South Carolina Aims To Educate Parents On Safe Sleeping Habits For Babies

A new state law requires hospitals to show parents a short film promoting safe sleep habits for newborn babies. 

Parents are already required to watch a video about shaken baby syndrome, which may cause brain injury if infants are handled roughly. But research shows unsafe sleep habits can be just as deadly.

In South Carolina an average of six infants die every month due to dangerous sleep practices.

In fact, babies are 18 times more likely to die from a sleep-related accident than in a motor vehicle crash, said Melanie “BZ” Giese, director of the South Carolina Birth Outcomes Initiative.

It isn’t a problem unique to South Carolina, she said. 

“It’s universally a problem in other states,” Giese said. 

Experts agree the safest sleep environment for infants is on their back in an empty crib. Decorative crib bumpers, stuffed animals, toys, pillows and blankets can be deadly. 

“The crib should be bare,” the American Academy of Pediatrics explained when the group updated its sleep recommendations in 2016. 

AAP recommends babies sleep in the same room as their parents, but not in the same bed, which may be dangerous.

Likewise, infants are also at risk if they fall asleep on a couch or while breastfeeding.

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Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.

Fort Benton Step-Grandmother Gets 3-Year Sentence For Shaking A Baby

A 14-month-old baby’s life expectancy has been reduced to just 30 years after he was repeatedly shaken by his step-grandmother, according to a pediatrician who testified at the sentencing on Tuesday. 

Jennie Lee Luraas, 46, was charged last June in Chouteau County District Court with assault on a minor for reportedly shaking the baby regularly to pull him out of seizures.

The infant was born addicted to opioids, which caused the Department of Family Services to place the boy with Luraas in the first place, Lindi Bjornson, the boy’s paternal grandmother, told the Tribune.

On Tuesday, Judge Daniel Boucher sentenced Luraas to 10 years with the Montana Department of Corrections with seven suspended. 

As part of her sentence, Luraas must also register as a violent offender. 

A DOC commitment can mean one of several things: Luraas may be sentenced to the women’s prison for three years, or she may spend that time with an ankle monitor out of custody.

Bjornson had asked the judget for a 20-year sentence in the Montana Women’s Prison with 10 suspended. 

“My prayer is the DOC keeps her for three years,” Bjornson said. 

Prosecutors filed the charge against Luraas on June 9, approximately seven days after a child-protective service worker with the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services reported to local law enforcement of a “shaken baby” case. The boy was 3-months-old at the time.

The child had been transported to Benefis by Luraas and her husband, Todd. They had taken custody of the baby after DPHHS had removed him from his parents.

A Benefis doctor told a Chouteau County deputy the baby had suffered several internal head injuries that, in her opinion, may be crippling, according to charging documents. The doctor also noted one of the head injuries appeared to be older than the others. She said the injuries appeared to be consistent with a child being shaken.

Luraas reportedly told the deputy that since she and her husband had taken custody of the boy, he had suffered several episodes of seizures, locking up and in some instances had stopped breathing. According to the deputy, Luraas said the only thing that works to get the boy out of the seizure is to put him in cold water and shake him. 

According to charging documents, Luraas demonstrated for the deputy how she grabs the baby and shakes him from side to side and back and forth. 

The baby was rendered blind as a result of the abuse. The pediatrician who testified also said the baby boy will not be able to swallow on his own, and will soon require 24/7 care. 

In February, Luraas offered to plead guilty to the original charge without a plea agreement from prosecutors. She pleaded guilty to the charge on March 6.

Federal bankruptcy records show Luraas and her husband had filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy less than two months prior to the incident. According to initial filings, they owed between $50,000 and $100,000 to 69 creditors.

Chouteau County Attorney Steve Gannon was unavailable for comment on Thursday about the case. Sheriff Vern Burdick was also unavailable. 

Bjornson said she had disputed the DFS placement with Luraas and Todd, Bjornson’s ex-husband, prior to the incident.

“It’s just been really tough,” Bjornson said. “He’s a beautiful baby.”

Bjornson said she will make an effort to advocate for mandatory sentences in such cases, as well as better education for mothers, DFS placement guardians and DFS workers. 

“It’s probably one of the most horrific things that can happen to a family,” she said. “I just got home to Minnesota yesterday, and I cried for 900 miles.”

This article was originally published by the Grand Falls Tribune.

Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.

Logan Core, Shaken Baby Survivor

Logan Core, a teenager from Water Valley, has one wish – to receive birthday cards for his Sweet 16 on April 21.

Core is a typical child in many ways. He loves cartoons, superheroes and all things Spongebob Squarepants. However, the things that make him different, and his positive attitude, are what make him remarkable.

The course of Logan’s life was changed on March 30, 2003, when he became a victim of shaken baby syndrome at the hands of his biological father. Core was 11 months old at the time, and his mother, Miranda Core, was given a bleak prognosis. Her son was left with 80 percent brain damage, a severe form of epilepsy, a broken leg and severe damage to his optical nerves. The injuries, doctors said, were the equivalent of falling 10 stories and landing on his head.

While the family didn’t know what the future would hold for Logan, Miranda refused to let her son’s story go untold. Since that day, she has devoted her life to advocating for her son and other victims of SBS, as well as making sure abusers are punished to the fullest extent of the law.

“Logan’s voice was taken from him, and as his mother it is my job to be a voice for him, to make sure he gets what he needs in school and life,” Miranda said. “It is also important to me that I raise awareness and tell Logan’s story, as it is a story that sadly matches so many other children.”

At the time, Logan’s abuser was given the maximum prison sentence for child abuse, 20 years. However, he served less than nine years, and was released on parole. Outraged that child abusers could walk free while many victims are sentenced to live with their injuries, Miranda and her husband, Nick, worked with state lawmakers to pass “Logan’s Law” in 2005.

The law gives judges the option to sentence child abusers to life in prison, and makes a life sentence mandatory for repeat offenders.

Today, Logan is wheelchair bound and legally blind, although he has regained a little vision over the years. He has cerebral palsy and is considered receptive yet nonverbal, as his speech is equivalent to a toddler. However limited he may seem, Miranda said Logan understands more than he’s given credit for.

“Often, people who do not know Logan have a tendency to baby talk him. This is quickly met with agitation from Logan, as well as him telling them to stop,” she said. “He understands much of what is said to him on the level that a young child would, and while he cannot speak more than a few one to two word phrases, he has no problem getting his point across through a combination of the words he does say, facial expression, vocal tone and body language.”

His speech and motor skills are limited, but Miranda said she and Nick, whom she calls a blessing, strive to make sure Logan has as normal a life as possible, whether he’s at his special needs school or at home with his younger sister, 5-year-old Marley.

Although the road hasn’t been easy, both Logan and Miranda have found a support group of thousands, thanks to their SBS advocacy page on Facebook. That community, Miranda said, is one way to share their family’s journey and hopefully, prevent more children from getting hurt.

“The best solution for preventing shaken baby syndrome is to raise awareness and educate parents and caregivers about the dangers of shaking,” she said. “It is our hope that by sharing Logan’s story through his Facebook group ‘Logan’s Journey – Shaken Baby Survivor,’ that we are both raising awareness about shaken baby syndrome and its consequences and are also offering encouragement to others who may share this journey.”

April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month, and Logan’s birthday, April 21, falls during Shaken Baby Syndrome Awareness Week. Miranda said the decision to incorporate birthday cards for Logan into their mission to advocate for those with SBS is to show Logan just how much he matters to others.

“Logan won’t get to celebrate this milestone 16th birthday like other kids his age. He won’t get his first after-school job, he won’t be getting his driver’s license and he will not drive his father and I crazy wanting a car, just to name a few things,” she said. “Instead, what we are hoping for is that we can flood him with cards, nothing fancy, just cards from all over to show him how loved he is.”

A family friend hosted a similar birthday card drive for him a few years ago, resulting in over 450 cards and gifts, as well as the creation of a support group.

This year, especially, is one when cards are needed. Last week, the family’s beloved dog, Macy, passed away, leaving everyone, especially Logan, heartbroken. According to Miranda, Macy had been Logan’s companion since about six months after his injury, rarely leaving his side.

Logan has faced what some would consider insurmountable obstacles. In spite of his limitations, he still manages to bring positive energy to those around him.

“Logan struggles with an array of medical problems, yet he still finds a way to smile and bring joy to those who know him,” Miranda said. “He has overcome so many odds and is truly such a bright spot in our lives that we just want to make his day as special as he is.”

Those wanting to send cards for Logan’s birthday can mail them to 8947 County Road 224, Water Valley, MS 38965. To join Logan’s Facebook support group, visit https://www.facebook.com/groups/logansSBSjourney.

This article was originally published by OxfordEagle.com.

Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.

Mother Spreads Awareness For Shaken Baby Syndrome

One local woman is using the loss of her baby girl, to spread hope and is making sure her legacy lives on. We want to warn you that what you are about to read may be disturbing to some.

“I only had her for a short amount of time but those short three months changed my entire life,” says Kim Threet.

On April 5th 2003, Hailee was in her father’s care when he took her to the hospital.

“After a couple of hours it came to be that  Hailee had been shaken, her retinas were completely detached from the back of her eyes. We had to fly her to salt lake and the next day they told me Hailee was brain-dead,” says Threet.

Doctors put Hailee on life support.

“The whole room began to spin. And I couldn’t breathe I felt like I was suffocating and I thought I was going to die because I couldn’t breathe. And he said we’re going to take her off life support and I said ‘could we wait for a miracle?’ and he said ‘I promise Kim there won’t be a miracle’ and I was sobbing and he said ‘We need to think of alternate plans,’ and I said, what do you mean alternate?”

That alternate plan, organ donation.

“And I looked at the doctor and said ‘that’s it.’ that’s what I’m supposed to do. If I can save another family from going through what I’m going through right now then I’ll do it, if that’s what I need to do that’s her job here, that’s the purpose of all of this. We were able to donate her heart and her liver to two different little boys.”

“Before the organ donation they let me hold her and I was able to listen to her heartbeat in this for the last time. And I’ve held onto it for the last 15 years hoping that maybe someday I’ll get the chance to use it on the little boy that has her heart and listen to her heartbeat again.”

Baby Hailee was able to save the lives of two kids and inspire her family.

“On the way here my daughter was saying that Hailee is her best friend. And they have a huge bond and she’s a huge part of our life and she’s set such a  big example for our kids about what it is to give and they say she’s their hero.”

And Hailee memory will continue to live on.

“I’m just grateful that I got the time that I did with her and the role that she has played in my life and the example that she’ll forever be for me and my kids and my husband.”

Hailee’s father, who is not Kim’s current husband, was charged with second-degree murder and served time for Hailee’s death.

Kim threet says she plans to help others who have lost infants.   

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Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.

Police: Man Shook And Slammed Baby Whose Brain Injuries Required Coma

Police say a 32-year-old Wisconsin Rapids man shook and hit his 3-month-old daughter, causing brain damage that required doctors to put her in a medically induced coma for a month.

Joseph P. Lemay, 32, Wisconsin Rapids, is in jail on a $100,000 cash bond set Friday by Wood County Circuit Judge Greg Potter for two counts of child abuse and two felony counts of child neglect.

Police charged the baby’s mother, Meghan E. Newman, 33, of Marshfield, with a felony charge of neglecting a child; the baby’s injuries occurred while Newman was away for the weekend.

According to court documents: 

Doctors at the Marshfield Medical Center on Feb. 18 reported to the Marshfield Police Department concerns about injuries suffered by a 3-month-old baby girl. The girl was bruised across her body, had “significant” brain bleeding and was having seizures, according to a doctor. 

The doctor told police the baby had serious injuries consistent with child abuse and shaken baby syndrome. The doctor said because the baby suffered significant brain trauma and brain hemorrhaging, doctors had to sedate her into a medically-induced coma where she would remain almost a month. 

Lemay told detectives he became frustrated with the baby when he was watching her for a weekend, and she wouldn’t stop crying and “slammed her onto the couch” a couple of times, which may have made her head shake. When detectives said that wouldn’t have caused the baby’s injuries, Lemay said he had become frustrated with the baby on the morning of Feb. 17 because she wouldn’t stop crying. He said he shook her in her bouncy seat for about 30 seconds, making her head snap back and forth. 

Lemay said when he finished shaking his daughter, she looked at him with a shocked expression and immediately began to cry. 

Lemay said he shook his daughter even more aggressively the next day when he again became frustrated with her crying. He said he shook her for one to two minutes with her head snapping back and forth. 

Newman told detectives that she left her children, including their 3-month-old baby, home with Lemay. Newman left town with friends at 11:30 a.m. Friday, Feb. 16. 

Newman said Lemay called her six times on the morning of Feb. 17. He told her the baby was throwing up and Newman told him to give the baby some medicine she had in the house. Newman told a detective that nothing Lemay said made her think something was seriously wrong with the baby. 

Lemay again called Newman on Sunday morning and said the baby threw up again. Newman wasn’t concerned and returned home as planned on Sunday evening. Newman told detectives the baby was warm to the touch when she arrived home and she decided to give her a bath. Newman noticed bruises on the baby but continued the bath rather than ask Lemay about them. 

When the baby began having seizures, Newman took her to Marshfield Medical Center. 

Newman told a detective she knew Lemay could get violent at times. She said she would have a neighbor look in on him as a safety precaution when he was watching the children. She did not have anyone check on Lemay during her weekend away. 

Lemay had been convicted of first-degree reckless injury in 2007 after he and another man beat a Marshfield man with a pipe. Lemay was sentenced to eight years in prison and eight years extended supervision, according to court records. 

Lemay said he and Newman both knew he was not supposed to spend the night at her residence and he was not supposed to have contact with children as part of the terms of his extended supervision. Police said Lemay told them Newman knew he had a history of violence with children. Doctors do not yet know how extensive the damage is to the baby’s brain.

Lemay’s next court appearance is scheduled for Friday. If convicted, he faces a maximum sentence of 105 years in prison. Newman faces a maximum sentence of 14 years in prison, if she is convicted. 

Newman is scheduled to make an initial appearance May 14 on a felony charge of neglecting a child and misdemeanor charges of encouraging a parole violation and obstructing an officer. 

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Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.

Greenacres-Area Woman Arrested For Shaking Baby

A baby’s hysterical cries screamed through the home as a Friday night in March turned into a Saturday morning.

The little girl’s caregiver, Kyanna Trenier Johnson, was exhausted. She picked up the 9-month-old and shook her

The Greenacres-area woman told a Palm Beach County sheriff’s detective she wasn’t sure how long, or how forcefully, she shook the baby.

All she knew was that the baby stopped the crying. 

Within 48 hours, the baby underwent brain surgery at St. Mary’s Medical Center in West Palm Beach, sheriff’s records state. She has multiple skull fractures, brain hemorrhaging and ruptures in her eye tissues. The injuries could be life-threatening, a doctor told sheriff’s authorities. By Tuesday, though, the baby’s condition had improved, a family member told The Post. 

Johnson, 28, was arrested early Saturday on an aggravated child abuse charge. She was released that afternoon on a $15,000 surety bond and ordered not to have contact with the baby, who is now 10 months old.

Johnson declined to comment for this story. However, a family member said he didn’t believe Johnson ever would hurt the child. 

Johnson does not appear to have a criminal history in Palm Beach County. 

The Florida Department of Children and Families said it plans “to hold the individual responsible to fullest extent of the law.”

“I am absolutely appalled that anyone would abuse an innocent child this way,” Secretary Mike Carroll said in a statement released late Tuesday.

A detective and a DCF investigator met with Johnson on March 26 in a waiting room outside St. Mary’s Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. 

Johnson, whose relationship with the infant is redacted from sheriff’s records, said the little girl hit her head in the bathtub about a week ago. Days after, the infant barely ate, slept unusual hours and cried incessantly. 

Johnson figured she had either a cold or growing pains. 

A few days later, the baby’s cries became hysterical screams, Johnson said. Late March 23, or early March 24, Johnson picked the shrieking baby up from the crib and shook her. 

The crying stopped.

Early on March 25, Johnson checked on the baby and noticed her diaper was wet. She positioned the baby to change her and noticed the little girl “was moaning (a) really soft, pitiful cry like a kitten or something,” she told authorities. 

The baby barely could keep her right eye open. She was limp and nearly unresponsive. She called 911. 

Preventing shaken baby syndrome

Doctors and researchers say education and counseling on normal infant-crying patterns and greater care for overwhelmed parents and caretakers can keep Shaken Baby Syndrome from happening. For more information, go online to www.dontshake.org/learn-more or call the

Johnson initially denied ever shaking the baby. Her live-in boyfriend, whom The Post is not naming because he does not face charges, said he hadn’t seen Johnson hurt the child. He never shook the baby, either, he said.

But when detectives spoke with Johnson again Friday — after a doctor determined the only way the baby could have sustained such seriously injured was by “severe shaking” — Johnson tearfully told a detective she never meant to hurt the baby. The detective noted in the arrest report how remorseful Johnson seemed. 

Records indicate she lives just outside the Greenacres city limits near Lake Worth and Haverhill roads with her boyfriend and two other children, 8 and 3.

However, it’s unclear whether that is where she was when she shook the baby. 

The child’s siblings are in the care of a relative, DCF said late Tuesday.

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Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.

Jacksonville Mother Speaks Out About Shaken Baby Syndrome

A Jacksonville mother is warning other parents about the shaken baby syndrome, the leading cause of child abuse deaths in the U.S.

Bonita Tate’s daughter Deshauna was shaken by a family member in 1995, when she was a 52-day-old baby.

“When I got home, I found her in her swing, lifeless. She had had no oxygen to her brain for over an hour.”

Now, 22 years later, her adult daughter is nonverbal, uses a wheelchair and still wears diapers.

According to the National Center on Shaken Baby Syndrome, the No. 1 trigger for shaken baby syndrome is frustration over a baby’s crying, and 25 percent of shaken babies die.

For children such as Deshauna, the complications can last a lifetime.

For resources and where to get information about shaken baby syndrome, visit dontshake.org.

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Shaken baby syndrome is a form of child abuse. When a baby is shaken hard by the shoulders, arms, or legs, it can cause learning disabilities, behavior disorders, vision problems or blindness, hearing and speech issues, seizures, cerebral palsy, serious brain injury, and permanent disability. In some cases, it can even be fatal.

Causes

Ever notice how long it takes babies to hold their heads up? Their neck muscles start out weak and get stronger as they grow. The same goes for their brains, which still need time to develop.

When a baby is shaken, its brain can bounce between the front and back of its skull. This causes it to bleed, bruise, and swell. It only takes a few seconds of aggressive shaking for this to happen.

What It’s Not

Shaken baby syndrome is different from gently tossing a baby playfully into the air or bouncing a baby on your knee. Though their brains and necks are fragile, babies are also unlikely to get shaken injuries by falling off furniture or making sudden stops in a car.

Symptoms

Being shaken affects babies in many different ways. Symptoms include vomiting, bluish skin, tremors or shakes, breathing issues, and drowsiness. Babies may also become less interested in eating; have trouble sucking, and stop smiling and talking.

Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.

Baby Boxes Help Parents

Having a baby can be overwhelming.

90 by 30 is trying to make it a little easier.

The county-wide program is dedicated to preventing child abuse by 90 percent by 2030 and in the fall of last year, it rolled out the first tangible program aimed at achieving that goal.

The Baby Box program provides families residing in Lane County newborn essentials and, hopefully, a connection to the community.

“It’s based on Finland’s concept,” said 90 by 30’s Rachel Norquist. “It’s surrounding the goal of a safe sleep system and preventing SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) but the box is a vehicle to create a connection with the community so new parents have a support system.”

While new parents in Finland get an empty box for babies to sleep in, parents who receive a box from 90 by 30, get a bit more.

In every box, there are newborn essentials: a sleep sack, onesies, diapers, wipes and sanitizer. But that’s not all. Families are also gifted donated items handmade by organizations like Tummy Time Quilt and Click for Babies Cap. Both organizations create the products specifically for the baby boxes and try to include encouragement even when it’s not immediately obvious.

“The caps for the babies have a lot of purple in them to represent the ‘period of purple crying.’ Just as a reminder to new parents,” Norquist said.

The Period of PURPLE Crying is part of the National Center on Shaken Baby Syndrome, a non-profit organization. The goal is to provide information to first-time parents on the misconceptions of “fussy” babies. According to the program, the period of PURPLE crying begins at approximately two weeks and runs until about four months old and is described as a developmental stage. The letters P-U-R-P-L-E- stand for Peak of Crying, Unexpected, Resists Soothing, Pain-like Face, Long Lasting and Evening, a way to remind parents that the crying will pass.

“It’s reassuring parents that sometimes babies cry and you’re not doing anything wrong,” Norquist said.

The program’s goal is to reduce frustration through education and decrease the cases of shaken baby syndrome. So, volunteers incorporate the color purple into their blankets and caps for the baby box.

“You should see their faces when they get this box,” Norquist said. “Some of our low-income families say they finally have a space for their baby.”

Since its conception last October, the program has handed out 26 baby boxes with only a staff of volunteers and one paid employee. “I come from corporate America and when we launched this box I said, ‘Guys, we just launched a product,’” Norquist said. “We launched a product with volunteers when it would have taken 30 people and a budget of a million dollars.”

Baby box applications are simple. South Lane County residents must fill out an invitation—which is less than a page long—or contact Norquist. There are no other requirements for receiving a baby box.

“It’s a self-referral program. We get people who their friends refer them but mostly it’s a self- referral and all they need is to reside in South Lane County,” Norquist said.

Currently, the program has 65 registrants and on Thursday, March 15, Norquist was off to deliver another box to a family and its newborn.

To register for a baby box or for more information, visit 90by30.com or contact (541) 870-0689.

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Scott Juceam is one of the leading advocates against Shaken Baby Syndrome. Scott’s life changed when his daughter Hannah was shaken to death by her nanny in 2006. Since then, Scott has dedicated his life to preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome and child abuse.

To learn more about me, please visit my website at www.ScottJuceam.com or you can click here.